Tartan

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Be inspired by the events taking place throughout the Year of Homecoming Scotland
Scotland welcomes the world in 2014

Come and experience all that is great about Scotland as part of the Year of Homecoming 2014

  • A group of men in full Highland dress
    A display of Highland dress
  • The Lonach Highlanders march at the Lonach Highland Gathering and Games, Strathdon
    The Lonach Highlanders at the Lonach Highland Gathering and Games, Strathdon
  • A close up of a piper wearing a brooch on his full Highland dress
    A piper wearing full Highland dress
  • A close up of several different types of tartan
    Several different types of tartan
  • The loom being used to produce tartan at the textile mill at Swanibost, Lewis
    A loom at the textile mill at Swanibost, Lewis

Uncover the fascinating history of one of Scotland’s most iconic products and discover how to find your own tartan.

Tartan, with its colourful threads in traditional patterns, is Scotland’s most famous textile. This patterned woven cloth has become one of the most iconic symbols of Scottish culture.

Tartan originated in the Highlands where clanspeople used local plants, mosses and berries to dye wool before spinning and weaving it into tartan. The patterns consist of interwoven vertical and horizontal lines, known as a sett. No-one knows exactly when tartan first came into use but the first known mention of tartan in Scotland dates from 1538.

The idea of clan and family tartans is thought to be a relatively new invention, following the standardisation of tartans worn by the Highland regiments of the 18th century, and during the Victorian period, when all things Scottish were considered fashionable. Prior to this, it is believed that clansmen were known to wear variety of different setts and the weave of cloth tended to be dictated by the custom of a particular area, rather than by clan or family affiliation.

If you wish to wear tartan, there are no strict rules on what sett to choose and there is plenty to choose from. Take a trip to the Clan Tartan Centre in Leith, Edinburgh, where you can search their database of 50,000 names and take away a certificate showing your clan name.

If you are looking for a specific colour of tartan, you can search through the thousands of designs on the Scottish Register of Tartans’ online collection to find your perfect colour combination and design.

You can learn more about the cloth at the Tartan Weaving Mill on the Royal Mile near Edinburgh Castle. The attraction boasts huge power looms, a mill shop and photography studio where you can get kitted out in Highland dress for the camera for a fantastic memento of your trip to Scotland.

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