Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

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Year of Natural Scotland 2013
Year of Natural Scotland 2013

Celebrate Scotland's natural beauty throughout 2013

  • A walker relaxes and takes in the view at the summit of Ben A'an, overlooking Loch Katrine
    The summit of Ben A'an, overlooking Loch Katrine
  • The main path to Ben Arthur, 'the Cobbler' near Arrochar in the National Park
    Ben Arthur, 'the Cobbler' near Arrochar in the National Park
  • People walk around in the sunshine at Benmore Botanic Gardens on the Cowal Peninsula
    Benmore Botanic Gardens on the Cowal Peninsula
  • A wood of bluebells near Loch Eck
    A wood of bluebells near Loch Eck
  • Looking down to the bridge at the Falls of Dochart, Killin
    Looking down to the bridge at the Falls of Dochart, Killin
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Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park was Scotland’s first National Park and comprises 720 square miles of beautiful mountains, glens and lochs.

Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National ParkLoch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park falls into four distinct parts: Loch Lomond, The Trossachs, Breadalbane and Argyll Forest.

Immortalised in song, Loch Lomond is the largest freshwater expanse in mainland Britain. Mountains loom to the north, while a scattering of islands can be found at the south end of the loch. Pretty villages such as Luss line the loch’s western shores. 

The Trossachs is ‘Rob Roy Country’ where the famous outlaw hid from his pursuers in the dense forests. The area was much loved by Scottish writer and poet Sir Walter Scott whose famous poem The Lady of the Lake was inspired by Loch Katrine, which you can cruise on the steamship SS Sir Walter Scott.

Breadalbane marks the beginning of the Highlands at the northern tip of the National Park. Here myths and legends abound and the enchanting Falls of Dochart run through the picturesque village of Killin.

At the western edge of the National Park is Argyll Forest Park. Britain’s first forest park is typified by its ancient trees, tranquil lochs and wide range of wildlife. Also within the park is Ben Arthur, affectionately known as ‘the Cobbler’ and one of Scotland’s most popular climbs.

The mountains and forests of the national park offer the perfect habitat to a diverse range of wildlife. Breeding pairs of ospreys take up residence in the park to mate each spring. Spending the summer months in Scotland, they can often be spotted hunting over Loch Venachar, Loch Lomond, Loch Eck and Lake of Menteith.

Of all the National Park's birdlife, none is more visually or vocally stunning as the rare Capercaillie, the world's largest grouse species. Their last remaining breeding ground are pinewoods on Loch Lomond's islands.

Forests also provide shelter to the red squirrel, Britain's only native squirrel. The National Park is one of the few places left where you can spot them as they scurry between branches.

On the woodland floor below, expect to see herds of male or female deer as they graze on grass, berries, young shoots and tree bark. Living separately for most of the year, in autumn, catch the spectacle of the 'rut' when the males aggressively lock antlers to win the right to mate.

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