Walking in Dundee & Angus

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  • A walking tour through the Angus Glens
    Angus Glens
  • Walkers pause to admire the view on the the Coastal Path from Arbroath to Auchmithie, Angus.
    The Coastal Path from Arbroath to Auchmithie, Angus.
  • A route near Cortachy, north of Kirriemuir
    A route near Cortachy, north of Kirriemuir
  • Looking towards the town of Montrose and the Montrose Basin, Angus
    The town of Montrose and the Montrose Basin, Angus
  • The Queen's Well, Glen Esk
    The Queen's Well, Glen Esk

From Dundee, the City of Discovery, to the highland hills of Angus merging into the Cairngorm National Park this superb region offers a variety of exhilarating walking experiences. Discover one of the most impressive and accessible waterfalls in Scotland at Reekie Linn, roam through the National Nature Reserve of Corrie Fee and see one of the best sites in the UK for montane flora or walk amidst the highland hills on Jock’s Road.

Go for a walk in Dundee & Angus

Dundee & Angus is a walkers’ paradise. From coastal walks following the River Tay to hilly treks leading to magnificent views, walking really is the best way to experience this beautiful region.

With one of our selected routes you’ll experience the beauty of the region with your own eyes. Below is just a small selection of the many trails you can follow. Find out more about walking routes, printable maps and GPS waypoints in Dundee & Angus.

Easy walks

  • Seaton Cliffs Nature Trail
    Duration: 2 hours.
    This easy to follow walk along the beautiful Arbroath coastline will take your breath away. This nature trail leads along the contours of the red sandstone cliffs, home to an abundance of sea bird species including puffin, guillemots and of course the sea gull.

  • Crombie Discovery Trail
    Distance: 4km; duration: 2 hours
    The longest walk of five in the Crombie Country Park, the Discovery Trail circles the whole of the park. Walking around the loch you’ll spot interpretation points along the way where you can find out more about roe deer, dykes, forestry and local history.

  • Hill of Rowan
    Distance: 7km; duration: 2.5 hours
    This easy circuit around Hill of Rowan follows good tracks over heather moorland, past the ruins of old farms and a Bronze Age settlement. There are impressive views towards the head of Glen Esk and the crags beyond Loch Lee.

  • Reekie Linn, Glen Isla
    Distance: 1km; duation: 40 minutes
    A very short walk through deciduous woodland leads to Reekie Linn, the most impressive waterfall found within Dundee & Angus. The woodland path which the trail follows often nears the rim of a deep gorge with an unprotected drop and great care is needed.

  • Montrose Basin
    Distance: 5.75km; duration: 1.5 - 2 hours
    The Montrose Basin is a large tidal basin of mud, sand, salt marsh and reed bed. It is an important local Nature Reserve and a great place to visit for birdwatchers. This walk visits parts of the western fringe of the basin, including two hides.

Moderate walks

  • Falls of Damff
    Distance: 15.75km; duration: 4 - 5 hours
    A fantastic circuit of Glen Lee taking in pretty Loch Lee and then climbing steeply past the Falls of Unich, offering fantastic vierws up the gorge with a good chnce of spotting birds of prey. As the land opens out the trail will pass the Fall of Damff to cross open moorland and descend the track on the Shank of Inchgrundle.

  • Corrie Fee, Glen Clova
    Distance: 7.5km; duration: 2 - 2.5 hours
    The National Nature Reserve at Corrie Fee is a massive bowl scooped out by a glacier. Following very well-made paths climbing gently to a viewpoint, you’ll discover the true beauty of the Corrie with the spectacular waterfall at the back.

  • Arbroath to Carnoustie
    Distance: 11km; duration 3 hours
    A one-way walk along the coast from Abroath to Carnoustie where the train (or bus) can be caught for the return. Almost level, the path is indistinct in places and uses two level crossings over the railway.

  • Queen’s Well
    Distance: 8km; duration: 2 - 2.5km
    A fairly easy walk in good weather, leading to the wilder Glen Mark at the head of Glen Esk. Visit the ornamental well erected to commemorate a visit by Queen Victoria and return down the glen or take an optional, lengthy detour to look for Balnamoon's Cave.

  • Edzell
    Distance: 10.5km; duration: 2.5 - 3 hours
    Follow the river North Esk upstream as it squeezes through an impressive gorge and enjoy woodland paths and a minor road through pleasant countryside to complete the circuit from picturesque Edzell.

Strenuous walks

  • Driesh and Mayar Munros
    Distance: 14km; duration: 4.5 hours
    A very picturesque ascent through Corrie Fee leads to the plateau and two Munros, Mayar and Driesh, with the descent on a good path back through Glendoll forest at the head of Glen Clova.

  • Loch Brandy Horseshoe
    Distance: 14.5km; duration: 5 hours
    Starting and finishing in the tiny village of Clova, this circular route can be difficult in parts but those who persevere are rewarded with stunning panoramic views of the beautiful glen.

  • Jock’s Road, Glen Doll
    Distance: 17km; duration: 5.5 hours
    Jick’s Road, so-called after a local shepherd, Jock winter, who in 1887 along with the Scottish Rights of Way Society, successfully challenged the landowner and established the route as a Right of Way. This well-known high-level route links Glen Cova to Braemar via Glen Doll and Glen Callater.

  • Mount Keen from Glen Esk
    Distance: 17.5km; duration: 5 - 7 hours
    The ascent from Glen Esk via Glen Mark is the shortest route up Mount Keen. The most easterly of the Munros is a dome rising above vast swathes of empty, bleak moorland, with extensive views on a good day.

Walking events and festivals

  • Angus Glens Walking Festival 
    The Angus Glens Walking Festival has been welcoming back walkers year after year to enjoy the spectacular the area has to offer. All of the walks offered by the festival are guided by experenced mountain leaders, countryside rangers, estate managers and ecologists who share their knowledge of local history and wildlife and are happy to answer any questions you may have. Angus is the perfect place to enjoy a walking holiday with a backdrop of breathtaking landscapes.

  • Dundee Mountain Festival
    Celebrating all things mountainous, the annual Dundee Mountain Film Festival presents a packed programme of speakers, exhibitions and award winning films from every genre of extreme activity and adventure, including polar exploration, high-altitude mountaineering, rock climbing, extreme sports, and much more. At least one festival session features a speaker and films with a strong Scottish flavour.
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