Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

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  • The main path to Ben Arthur, 'the Cobbler' near Arrochar in the National Park
    Ben Arthur, 'the Cobbler' near Arrochar in the National Park
  • A wood of bluebells near Loch Eck
    A wood of bluebells near Loch Eck
  • Looking down to the bridge at the Falls of Dochart, Killin
    Looking down to the bridge at the Falls of Dochart, Killin
  • The steamship Sir Walter Scott at the Trossachs Pier, Loch Katrine
    The steamship Sir Walter Scott at the Trossachs Pier, Loch Katrine
  • A small boat on the calm waters of Loch Lomond
    Loch Lomond
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Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park was Scotland’s first National Park and comprises 720 square miles of beautiful mountains, glens and lochs.

Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park falls into four distinct parts: Loch Lomond, The Trossachs, Breadalbane and Argyll Forest.

Immortalised in song, Loch Lomond is the largest freshwater expanse in mainland Britain. Mountains loom to the north, while a scattering of islands can be found at the south end of the loch. Pretty villages such as Luss line the loch’s western shores. 

The Trossachs is ‘Rob Roy Country’ where the famous outlaw hid from his pursuers in the dense forests. The area was much loved by Scottish writer and poet Sir Walter Scott whose famous poem The Lady of the Lake was inspired by Loch Katrine, which you can cruise on the steamship SS Sir Walter Scott.

Breadalbane marks the beginning of the Highlands at the northern tip of the National Park. Here myths and legends abound and the enchanting Falls of Dochart run through the picturesque village of Killin.

At the western edge of the National Park is Argyll Forest Park. Britain’s first forest park is typified by its ancient trees, tranquil lochs and wide range of wildlife. Also within the park is Ben Arthur, affectionately known as ‘the Cobbler’ and one of Scotland’s most popular climbs.

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