Literary connections in Perthshire

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  • The City of Perth and the River Tay viewed from the Queen's Bridge on a bright summer's day
    The Fair City of Perth, Scotland's ancient capital and the former home of acclaimed poet William Soutar
  • A ruined bridge wth a waterfall behind crosses a mountain stream in Glen Lyon, west of Aberfeldy
    Glen Lyon, described by Sir Walter Scott as the ‘longest, loneliest and loveliest glen in Scotland’
  • Visitors look at the antique book in Innerpeffray Library - Scotland's first free Public Lending Library, by Crieff
    Innerpeffray Library - Scotland's first free Public Lending Library, by Crieff
  • A burns rushes into the Moness Gorge through the Birks of Aberfeldy
    The Birks of Aberfeldy which inspired the poem of the same name by Robert Burns

Explore Perthshire and uncover a wide range of literary connections to famous novels and authors like Beatrix Potter, Ian Maclaren, Naomi Mitchison, James Kennaway, Rosamunde Pilcher and many more.

Beatrix Potter, the author behind The Tale of Peter Rabbit spent her childhood summers at Dalguise House, near Dunkeld and this beautiful part of Perthshire no doubt inspired her imagination and love of nature. Take the kids to meet Mrs Tiggywinkle and Mr Jeremy Fisher in the Beatrix Potter Exhibition and Garden in Dunkeld and learn more about the famous children’s author.

Often referred to as ‘Big Tree Country’, Perthshire’s verdant forests are home to the Fortingall Yew - the oldest living organism in Europe and the majestic Birnam Oak at Dunkeld, which is considered the last remaining survivor of the wood depicted in Shakespeare’s Macbeth. See the stunning waterfalls that inspired Robert Burns to compose the Birks of Aberfeldy and admire Glen Lyon, described by Sir Walter Scott as the ‘longest, loneliest and loveliest glen in Scotland’.

The centuries-old House of Gleneagles is the backdrop to The Bull Calves by Naomi Mitchison, which was published in 1947 and several other authors such as James Kennaway, Ian Maclaren, Rosamunde Pilcher, Ronald Frame and Alan Massie are based in the area or have set their works in rural Perthshire.

In Perth, Scotland’s newest city, the former house of famous Scots poet William Soutar can be visited by appointment and two walks have been designed to give an insight into aspects of his life. Both offer a great way to see the 'Fair City' on foot whilst passing some of the landmarks and places immortalised in his poetry.

Continue an exploration of Perthshire’s fascinating literary connections at the Library of Innerpeffray, the oldest free public lending library in the country and the genesis of the Scottish Enlightenment. Here you’ll find 5,000 books, most published before 1800, including many rare copies beautifully bound in leather and vellum.
 

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