Borders Abbeys

The Scottish Borders has four remarkable abbeys. Once the grandest, Kelso Abbey was subject to sustained cannon fire by Henry VIII’s armies during the Rough Wooing of the 1540s. Beside the River Tweed you can explore the ruins of Dryburgh Abbey, a fine example of Gothic architecture. At Jedburgh Abbey you can explore the tranquil herb garden and see amazing artefacts on display and at Melrose Abbey you can visit the Chapter House, where the heart of King Robert the Bruce is thought to be buried.

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Kelso Abbey

Kelso Abbey

Attraction

Visit the magnificent Kelso Abbey in the Scottish Borders, dating as far back as the 12th century. Kelso Abbey was built in 1128 and in the years following, it was one of the finest examples of Romanesque architecture.

Ruin of Melrose Abbey

Melrose Abbey

Attraction

Melrose Abbey is a magnificent ruin with lavishly decorated masonry. Probably the most famous ruin in Scotland, the abbey was founded by David I in 1136 for the Cistercian Order and was largely destroyed by Richard II's English army in 1385.

Dryburgh Abbey

Dryburgh Abbey

Perhaps the most beautiful of all the Border Abbeys, the ruins of Dryburgh Abbey are remarkably complete and surrounded by beautiful grounds.

Jedburgh Abbey

Jedburgh Abbey

Attraction

One of the four border abbeys, Jedburgh Abbey was founded by David I in around 1138 for Augustinian canons.