Get behind the wheel of a campervan and experience the unfettered freedom that comes with being able to pull over and set up camp where and when you choose.

A campervan really does offer the perfect getaway for anyone who relishes the prospect of exploring the rural locales and remote corners of Scotland on the open road.

Here are just some of the destinations and routes that are worth the road trip.

1. Jedburgh and Lauder

Jedburgh Abbey

Whether you are passing through the Scottish Borders on your way to your final destination or are curious about this lovely region,  you can pitch up at sites in Jedburgh and Lauder. You can explore the region’s wide open spaces at your leisure, with walking trails including the Southern Upland Way, the Borders Abbey Way, and St Cuthbert’s Way all easily accessible.

2. Isle of Skye

Quiraing road Skye

When it comes to exploring Skye by car the possibilities are endless. The whole of Skye is spectacular to drive around no matter which direction you set off in. Pitch up on the shores of Loch Greshornish and soak up the views across the gleaming water to the hills beyond while Highland cattle and sheep graze nearby.

3. Glencoe to Fort William

Three Sisters Glencoe

The route from Glencoe to Fort William is one of Scotland’s essential road trips. Before you embark on this unforgettable drive, why not spend a day or two parked at the foot of Glencoe’s awe-inspiring mountains, surrounded by lush woodlands managed by the National Trust for Scotland? Positively ripe for on-foot explorations, the West Highland Way and many other low and high-level walks pass through the vicinity. You can even bag a couple of Munros while here.

4. Blair Atholl

Blair Castle exterior

Experience the epitome of relaxed camping against the magnificent backdrop of Blair Castle. Just a stone’s throw away from the popular holiday-maker destinations of Pitlochry, Aberfeldy and Dunkeld, this picturesque spot in the Cairngorms National Park allows you to get away from it all while still offering plenty to see and do. Pitch up Blair Castle Caravan Park and enjoy a range of outdoor pursuits with Atholl Estates and take your pick from all kinds of adventure sports.

5. Assynt to Sutherland

Loch Bad a' Ghaill

  Photo by plattbridger via Flickr | Creative Commons

‘Dramatic’ doesn’t even begin to cover the natural beauty of the journey from Assynt and into the heart of Sutherland country. Set off on the road to Inchnadamp and as you make your way north, pause at one of a seemingly endless number of trout-teeming lochs to cast your line in the company of golden eagles and great northern divers. Continuing northwards, take in the dramatic peaks of Quinag before pushing on to the delightful crofting village of Scourie. Here you can park in village's caravan and camping park overlooking the bay and experience some unforgettable sunrises and sunsets. Turn east at Laxford Bridge and follow the River Laxford on up to Loch Stack where you can spend the days climbing rugged mountains, following old stalkers' paths to secluded lochs, or simply sit back, relax and soak up the tranquility.

6. Loch Ness

The part that I forgot about

 Photo by mendhak via Flickr | Creative Commons

There are sites in and around Loch Ness which manage to feel secluded and unspoilt in spite of their popularity. There is the eco-friendly Loch Ness Shores site located on the sedate south shore, Loch Ness Holiday Park which sits directly opposite the Great Glen Way, and the wood-shrouded Cumberland's Campsite, where the Duke of Cumberland's soldiers camped following Culloden. Surrounded by pine trees and with umpteen Munros and superlative cycling and kayaking right on your doorstep, it is hard to think of a more ideal place in which to experience Scotland’s great outdoors.

7. Glasgow to Machrihanish

  Machrihanish Dunes

The Kintyre peninsula is one of Scotland’s most secluded destinations and the route leading to it is positively spellbinding. From central Glasgow, follow the A83 as it winds past Loch Lomond before embarking upon a breathtaking three-hour journey down the A83, sometimes referred to as “the long and winding road,” one of the UK’s most scenic car journeys. Along the way, take in the Rest and Be Thankful Pass, skim the shores of the picturesque Loch Fyne, and pass the stately Inveraray Castle. Continue along the beautiful Kintyre coast to Campbeltown before making the short cross-country drive to Machrihanish. Here you can pitch up at the marvellously well-equipped Machrihanish Holiday Park which offers a complete range of home comforts including free WiFi and a view overlooking the acclaimed Machrihanish Dunes course. Don't forget to bring your clubs!

8. Scone Palace

Scone Palace

Pull in to the estate of Scone Palace, the home of the legendary Stone of Destiny, and get back to nature at Scone Camping & Caravanning Club Site. Deer, buzzards, owls and ospreys have all been spotted here. You might even find yourself sharing your pitch with one of the site’s resident black rabbits. In addition to the palace, take the time to explore the grounds, including its beautifully manicured lawns and pinetum, and enjoy tranquil walks along the River Tay.

9. Edinburgh to St Andrews

The Forth Rail Bridge

Drive across the Queensferry Crossing to Fife. Opened in 2017, it's neighboured by the Forth Road Bridge and the world-famous Forth Bridge - these three engineering wonders span three centuries. Continue along the scenic coastal route around the East Neuk, stopping to call in at pretty fishing villages like Anstruther, Elie and Pittenweem before you reach St Andrews, The Home of Golf. Stretch out the journey and spend a day or two in the East Neuk at Elie Holiday Park at Shell Bay, Woodland Gardens Caravan & Camping in Leven or St Monans Holiday Park.

10. Rest and Be Thankful pass

Rest and Be Thankful Pass

Drive across the Arrochar Alps in Glen Croe to the Rest and Be Thankful pass where you can pull in to the roadside bay viewpoint and picnic area to stretch your legs and soak up the dramatic natural splendour before you. If you want to stay over for a night in the area, the Scottish Forestry Commission’s Honeymooner’s Bridge Car Park is nearby and has limited spaces for campervans and larger vehicles.