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Bucinch & Ceardach

  • Nature Centres & Reserves
  • Luss
  • Loch Lomond

Two small uninhabited islands, between Luss and Balmaha, in Loch Lomond.

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Uninhabited and unspoiled for centuries, Bucinch literally means ‘island of goats’. The island’s rocky terrain is perfectly suited for mountain goats and the whole island is also a breeding ground for a large number of ground-nesting birds. On the south east shore there are the remains of an old stone jetty.

Situated to the east of Bucinch, Ceardach is known locally as Tinker's Island. It is a tiny islet which is little more than a rocky mass surrounded by deep water. The island supports oak and willow trees, while brambles and holly are also plentiful. During dry weather, and thanks to the shallow soil, Ceardach enjoys a peculiar natural quirk in summer, when the soil quickly turns the vegetation brown, giving the island a premature autumnal feel.

Ceardach has a natural harbour, which is easily accessed near some flat exposed rocks, making it suitable for picnics. Archaeological evidence has also uncovered traces of an Iron Age furnace dating back centuries, which could have been used for melting ore. 


 

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Uninhabited and unspoiled for centuries, Bucinch literally means ‘island of goats’. The island’s rocky terrain is perfectly suited for mountain goats and the whole island is also a breeding ground for a large number of ground-nesting birds. On the south east shore there are the remains of an old stone jetty.

Situated to the east of Bucinch, Ceardach is known locally as Tinker's Island. It is a tiny islet which is little more than a rocky mass surrounded by deep water. The island supports oak and willow trees, while brambles and holly are also plentiful. During dry weather, and thanks to the shallow soil, Ceardach enjoys a peculiar natural quirk in summer, when the soil quickly turns the vegetation brown, giving the island a premature autumnal feel.

Ceardach has a natural harbour, which is easily accessed near some flat exposed rocks, making it suitable for picnics. Archaeological evidence has also uncovered traces of an Iron Age furnace dating back centuries, which could have been used for melting ore. 


 

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