Availability Search for Hoy & Graemsay

Hoy & Graemsay

  • Islands

Hoy is located to the south of the archipelago and with an area of 57 square miles it is the second largest island in Orkney.

Directions

Road Directions

Hoy takes its name from the Old Norse 'haey', meaning 'High Island'. Visitors to the island will discover the island is steeped in history. There are a variety of fascinating sites dating from prehistoric times and the Viking period including the Dwarfie Stane, the only rock-cut chambered tomb in Britain.

The richness of heritage is equalled by a treasure trove of natural history. The north and west are hilly and more 'Highland' in character while the south and east are low-lying and fertile, more typical of Orkney in general. High sea cliffs offer excellent walking and the west coast in particular abounds natural beauty. The dramatic summits of Ward Hill and the Cuilags stand in splendid contrast to the rest of Orkney and can be seen from almost anywhere on the Orcadian mainland. The island is also famous for its towering sea stack, the Old Man of Hoy. Further along the coastline is St John’s Head, at 351 m high it is Britain’s tallest vertical cliff face.

Please visit http://www.hoyorkney.com/ for more information on Hoy.

With a charm of its own, Graemsay is also worth a visit, with almost no traffic to disturb the tranquillity. Enjoy walking across the beautiful sandy beach at Sandside and fantastic views out across Scapa Flow. Please visit www.graemsay.org.uk for more information on Graemsay.

Public Transport Directions

Hoy takes its name from the Old Norse 'haey', meaning 'High Island'. Visitors to the island will discover the island is steeped in history. There are a variety of fascinating sites dating from prehistoric times and the Viking period including the Dwarfie Stane, the only rock-cut chambered tomb in Britain.

The richness of heritage is equalled by a treasure trove of natural history. The north and west are hilly and more 'Highland' in character while the south and east are low-lying and fertile, more typical of Orkney in general. High sea cliffs offer excellent walking and the west coast in particular abounds natural beauty. The dramatic summits of Ward Hill and the Cuilags stand in splendid contrast to the rest of Orkney and can be seen from almost anywhere on the Orcadian mainland. The island is also famous for its towering sea stack, the Old Man of Hoy. Further along the coastline is St John’s Head, at 351 m high it is Britain’s tallest vertical cliff face.

Please visit http://www.hoyorkney.com/ for more information on Hoy.

With a charm of its own, Graemsay is also worth a visit, with almost no traffic to disturb the tranquillity. Enjoy walking across the beautiful sandy beach at Sandside and fantastic views out across Scapa Flow. Please visit www.graemsay.org.uk for more information on Graemsay.

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