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Quarrymill Woodland Park

  • Forests & Woodlands

Quarrymill Woodland Park is situated on A93, half a mile north of Perth, and includes three excellent waymarked walks.

Directions

Road Directions

Historically, stone was quarried on this site to provide building material for local houses and watermills were erected to harness the force of the running water from the nearby Annaty Burn.

Today, visitors can enjoy an array of wildlife, as the millpond is home to mallards, moorhens and tufted ducks which feast on the ample supply of Canadian pondweed available all year round. The burn is also home to many dipper birds who feed on the water insects.

During springtime, bluebells carpet the woodland floor beneath the old beech trees and red squirrels are often spotted around the Scots pine trees. These trees date from the 1930s and were planted by eminent local businessman and philanthropist, Arthur Kinmond Bell, of Bells whisky fame.

Access for wheelchairs users has been created along two of the walks, which also include picnic areas and viewing platforms across the forest.

A slightly longer walk runs through Quarrymill and on to the suburb of Scone and Scone Old Parish Church.  In the churchyard stands a monument to Scone-born botanist David Douglas (1799 -1834), who became famous for introducing 200 new plants to Britain.

Further information about the Quarrymill Woodland Park walks is available from Perth Visitor Information Centre.

 

Public Transport Directions

Historically, stone was quarried on this site to provide building material for local houses and watermills were erected to harness the force of the running water from the nearby Annaty Burn.

Today, visitors can enjoy an array of wildlife, as the millpond is home to mallards, moorhens and tufted ducks which feast on the ample supply of Canadian pondweed available all year round. The burn is also home to many dipper birds who feed on the water insects.

During springtime, bluebells carpet the woodland floor beneath the old beech trees and red squirrels are often spotted around the Scots pine trees. These trees date from the 1930s and were planted by eminent local businessman and philanthropist, Arthur Kinmond Bell, of Bells whisky fame.

Access for wheelchairs users has been created along two of the walks, which also include picnic areas and viewing platforms across the forest.

A slightly longer walk runs through Quarrymill and on to the suburb of Scone and Scone Old Parish Church.  In the churchyard stands a monument to Scone-born botanist David Douglas (1799 -1834), who became famous for introducing 200 new plants to Britain.

Further information about the Quarrymill Woodland Park walks is available from Perth Visitor Information Centre.

 

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