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100 great geosites

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As the joke goes, geology rocks! And so it seems, does Scotland! The Geological Society of London has put together the top 100 geosites in the UK to celebrate the start of Earth Science Week.

There are 38 sites in Scotland on the list, covering everything from landscapes and the coast, to sites marked by fire and ice!

You can find the full list on their website, along with a map of all the locations, but here are just a few amazing sites for you to enjoy. Which ones have you visited, and which ones would you love to see for yourself? Share your pics and comments with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and more!

The Cuillin hills, Skye

The Cuillin hills, Skye

Cuillin hills

Chosen for their adventurous side, the Cuillin hills in Skye are well-loved for their dramatic look. This rocky mountain range is also known as the Black Cuillin, and the mountain’s highest point is Sgurr Alasdair at 3,255 ft (992 m).

The sharp peaks, which rise up from the flatness of the surrounding terrain, are the dominating feature of the island and can be seen from every other peninsula on Skye.

Sango Bay, Durness

Sango Bay, Durness

Sango Bay and Smoo Cave

With golden sands, rocky formations and plenty of sheltered outcrops, Sango Bay offers visitors a beautiful mixed landscape. With its cliffs, rocks and sand dunes, Sango Bay is one of the most spectacular and varied beaches in the Highlands.

Old Man of Hoy, Orkney

Old Man of Hoy, Orkney

Old Man of Hoy and St John’s Head

Also nominated for the adventurous category, the Old Man of Hoy is a famous 450 ft sea stack, first climbed in 1966 in a televised assault, and perhaps Orkney’s most famous landmark. You can take a three hour round trip walk from Rackwick to the Old Man of Hoy. 

Calanais Standing Stones

Calanais Standing Stones

Calanais Standing Stones

Nominated as a great geosite to see the history left by people, the Calanais Standing Stones are believed to have been erected around 2,900 BC and are a subject of much intrigue and speculation. Forming one of the most complete stone circles in Britain, the site’s ageless mystery, impressive scale and undeniable beauty leaves a lasting impression.

 

The list also includes well-known icons such as Arthur’s Seat, the Isle of Staffa and Glencoe, alongside some other gems such as Funzie in Shetland, St Kilda and Siccar Point, in the Scottish Borders.

Read the full list of 100 great geosites, share yours with #100geosites or plan your trip to see them in Scotland now using www.visitscotland.com.

 

 

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