If you have found yourself caught in the mystical and spell-binding Outlander saga and wish to be swept away to Claire and Jamie's world, come and experience the land that inspired the writer Diana Gabaldon and the TV series producers. From ancient and mysterious standing stones to dramatic castles, magnificent stately homes and breathtaking landscapes, visit Scotland and embark on an inspiring journey.

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    Doune Castle

    Doune Castle

    The stunning Doune Castle, near Stirling, plays a leading role in the show substituting for the fictional Castle Leoch – home to Colum MacKenzie and his clan in the 18th century episodes. It also features in the 20th century episode where Claire and Frank visit the castle in ruins on a day trip.

    Once a royal residence, Doune Castle is full of charm. Tour the castle and find out how grand banquets would have once been prepared in the kitchen as well as admiring its 100 ft high gatehouse and stunningly preserved great hall.

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    Rannoch Moor

    Kinloch Rannoch

    Dunalastair Estate near Kinloch Rannoch provides the famous backdrop to Claire’s mysterious disappearance through the standing stones. You won't find the Craigh na Dun stone circle there, but you can still admire the natural beauty of the area. The nearby Rannoch Moor is an equaly idyllically-located land that is dotted with innumerable lochs, streams, rivers and rocky outcrops, and surrounded by breathtaking Munros – mountains that rise over 3,000 ft. Did you know that Sam Heughan loves 'Munro bagging'?

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    Culross

    Culross

    The rustic town of Culross in Fife saw its Mercat area transformed into the fictional village of Cranesmuir – the home of Geillis Duncan and her husband Arthur. A stroll along the town’s charming cobbled alleyways is about as close to stepping back in time to the 18th century as you can get.

    Behind the impressive historic Culross Palace is where you can find the gorgeous herb garden that Claire works. It’s planted with lawns, herbs and vegetables of the period – a real highlight for a true Outlander fan.

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    Tulloch Ghru

    Tulloch Ghru

    The hilly and wooded area of Tulloch Ghru hosts several key scenes from the series, including the journey Claire takes with Jamie and the Highlanders from Craigh na Dun to Castle Leoch, as well as featuring in the opening credits.

    Located just outside Aviemore, it’s on the doorstep of the Cairngorms National Park – Britain’s largest national park, and is a popular holiday destination boasting truly stunning scenery.

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    Falkland

    Falkland

    You can recreate one of the first scenes of the TV series in the town of Falkland in Fife, which substituts for 1940s Inverness. See if you can recognise the familiar cosy look of Mrs. Baird's Guesthouse in The Covenanter Hotel, stand by the Bruce Fountain where Frank witnesses the ghost of Jamie looking up at Claire in the first episode, Campbell's Coffee Shop is just across the road, or further down the street is Fayre Earth Gift Shop which stood in for Farrell's Hardware and Furniture Store.

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    Glencorse Old Kirk

    Glencorse Old Kirk

    The charming Glencorse Old Kirk near Edinburgh, nestled in the grounds of the Glencorse House in the foothills of the picturesque Pentland Hills, is where Claire and Jamie tie the knot.

    With its lush parkland, lake and splendid garden, it’s a wonderfully atmospheric venue, if not one of the most romantic wedding venues imaginable for an Outlander fan.

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    Highland Folk Museum

    Highland Folk Museum

    Replicas of 18th century turf-roofed Highland crofts at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore stood in for period scenes, including the background for the scene where Claire, Jamie and his clansmen shelter in the first episode, in an around the MacKenzie village, and later when Dougal collects the rent.

    The museum brings to life the domestic and working conditions of earlier Highland people. Learn how Scottish Highlanders lived, how they built their homes, dressed and more.

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    Bo'ness & Kinneil  Railway

    Bo'ness & Kinneil Railway

    The Bo’ness & Kinneil Railway in West Lothian was transformed to double as a wartime London railway station where Claire and Frank say their goodbyes.

    Tour this heritage railway and explore Scotland’s largest railway museum, before taking advantage of the chance to board a preserved vintage steam train or diesel-hauled train.

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    Aberdour Castle

    Aberdour Castle

    The delightful 12th century Aberdour Castle doubles as Sainte Anne de Beaupré’s monastery in France which Jamie flees to; the castle’s Old Kitchen and Long Gallery were used for filming.

    Situated on the Fife coast, this splendid ruined castle was once a luxurious Renaissance home, and is amongst the oldest standing masonry castles in Scotland.

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    Hopetoun House

    Hopetoun House

    The splendid Hopetoun House, situated in South Queensferry on the outskirts of Edinburgh, doubles as the stately home of Duke of Sandringham. It’s considerably superior in real life to how it appears in the TV show as some of its wings were digitally erased.

    The house is one of Scotland’s finest examples of the work of Scottish architects Sir William Bruce and William Adam; you can still admire much of its original 18th century furniture and wall coverings when you tour the site.

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    Linlithgow

    Linlithgow Palace

    The majestic ruins of Linlithgow Palace, once a favoured royal residence of the Stewart kings and queens and the birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots, stands in for the prison entrance and corridors in the scene where Jamie is imprisoned.

    This wonderful 15th century ruin still brings a sense of awe when entering through its gates into its elegant cobbled courtyard. It also offers a great insight into what life in such a vast palace must have been like.

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    Blackness Castle

    Blackness Castle

    Standing looking out over the Firth of Forth near Edinburgh is impressive Blackness Castle. This 15th century fortress provides the setting for the Fort William headquarters of Black Jack Randall as well as featuring in the heart-wrenching scene of Jamie's incarceration.

    The castle was built by one of the most powerful families in Scotland, the Crichtons, and is often referred to as 'the ship that never sailed' due to its ship-like shape.

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    George Square, Glasgow

    George Square, Glasgow

    The historic George Square in Glasgow was turned into a 1940s set to film Frank's spontaneous proposal to Claire.

    While you may not find old-fashioned vehicles and trench-coat wearing men when you visit, you will instantly feel as if you stepped back in time as the area boasts many ornate buildings with fine period features.

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    Troon

    Troon

    The quaint seaside town of Troon in Ayrshire is the setting for the scene where Claire, Jamie and Murtach arrive at the coast and board a 17th century ship to deliver Jamie to the Abbey of Sainte Anne de Beaupré in France.

    Overlooking the Isle of Arran, Troon is a wonderful destination for a relaxing seaside holiday. Explore the town’s bustling harbour, which is a popular fishing port and a sailing centre, or enjoy its sandy beaches with magnificent views.

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    Preston Mill

    Preston Mill

    In the village of East Linton is the picturesque Preston Mill – one of the oldest, working, water-driven meal mills in Scotland. It provided the backdrop for a number of scenes set in the 1940s.

    Tour the mill to see and hear the mechanisms in action, or catch an exhibition on the history of Preston Mill and the people who lived and worked here.

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    Pollok Country Park

    Pollok Country Park

    It is at the Pollok Country Park where Claire searches for medicines and herbs to treat the ill in the show. It also doubles as the grounds surrounding the fictional Castle Leoch.

    Pollok Country Park was once voted the best park in Britain and Europe, and its extensive woodlands and gardens offer an excellent playground, packed with curious wildlife and great range of activities, including golf.

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Outlander Film Locations

Craigh na Dun or Castle Leoch may have been a figment of Outlander author Diana Gabaldon's imagination but this fascinating world of standing stones, romantic castles and sweeping scenery was inspired by real places and heritage. Not only that, the TV adaptation was filmed entirely on location in Scotland. Follow this map and discover the sites in Scotland that double for the fictional land of Claire and Jamie.

Delve into the world of Outlander

Discover intriguing history, fascinating culture,
breathtaking nature, mouth-watering larder,
and maybe even that Scotland is the land of your ancestors!

  • Nature and landscape

     
    Nature

    Roam the great outdoors

    If you liked the Scottish landscape you saw on the screen - the rolling green hills and majestic mountains and stunning rivers and lochs, come to Scotland and experience it all first hand - you will be wowed!

    Woodlands and forests are teeming with wildlife, parks and gardens are packed with exotic species and the thousands of miles of beautiful coastline guarantee you will find the ideal beach or island for your relaxing break.

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  • Ancestry

     
    Ancestry

    Research your ancestry

    Did you know that there are over 50 million people across the world that can lay claim to Scottish ancestral ties? Are you one of them perhaps? You could be Jamie's ancestor or a descendent of Clan MacKenzie, or another famous Scot!

    Find a wide range of family history resources to help you explore your roots.

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  • Traditional food and drink

     
    Food

    Discover Scottish flavours

    Scotland is renowned for its unrivalled produce worldwide, from porridge and Crannachan to Scotch broth and the smoked fish soup Cullen Skink.

    Sample the distinctive tastes of whisky or haggis - very popular in Jamie's time. It's probably as close to the 18th century food as you can get!

    Learn more about the traditional Scottish food and throw an Outlander-inspired dinner party with the help of our fantastic Scottish recipes.

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  • Uniquely Scottish

     
    Uniquely Scottish

    Uniquely Scottish

    From tartan to bagpipes, from Highland gatherings to Highland games, these icons of Scotland are recognised worldwide and are part of Highland culture.

    Uncover the fascinating history of kilt from its early origin in the Highlands to the modern kilts of today. You can even design your own tartan for a kilt!

    The language spoken by the Outlander characters is Gaelic, and it can still be heard in some parts of Scotland. Try to master a few useful phrases yourself!

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  • History and Legends

     
    History

    Delve into the past

    Learn about Bonnie Prince Charlie, the Battle of Culloden and the Jacobite Risings, or relive this era at many themed events or at the Highland Folk Museum where you can get an insight into what life was like in 18th century.

    Scotland is dotted with fascinating historic sites, from romantic castles to enigmatic standing stones, while the country's past is shrouded in mystery and legends. Find your ideal Castle Leoch or the mysterious Craigh na Dun!

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The Outlander phenomenon

The best-selling novels by an American chart-topping writer Diana Gabaldon centre around Claire Randall, a WWII nurse living in the 1940s with her husband Frank. While on their second honeymoon to Scotland, Frank researches his family history and to pass time, Claire goes plant-gathering near a stone circle from where she gets mysteriously sent back in time to 1743 war-torn Scotland. She meets a young and chivalrous Scottish warrior Jamie Fraser, falls for him and is left torn between her 18th and 20th century lives.

Outlander's book locations

Inverness, where the adventure unfolds...

Inverness River Ness dusk

Roam the streets of Inverness where Claire's adventure begins while on her second honeymoon with Frank. If you too have roots in the Highlands like Frank does, head to the Highland Archive Centre and uncover your family's Scottish history. Or venture beyond Inverness in search of the mysterious Craigh na Dun, which swept Claire back in time; the nearby Clava Cairns are said to have provided an inspiration for this site. Visit it and experience the mystical atmosphere for yourself.

Loch Ness, Urquhart Castle & Beauly

Urquhart Castle

Enjoy a day trip to Loch Ness and keep an eye out for the legendary and elusive Loch Ness Monster, referred to as the water horse in the novel, as you cruise on the calm waters. The magnificent ruins of Urquhart Castle, perched on a rocky peninsula, on the very edge of the loch, are the perfect spot for a picnic. Why not extend your stay in the area and take in the nearby village of Beauly? It's associated with Clan Fraser of Lovat from whom Jamie descends. Here, you can also visit the tranquil ruins of Beauly Priory where Claire meets Maisri the seer.

The romantic Great Glen Way

Glen Affric loch sun

The journey along the Caledonian Canal and Great Glen Way towards Fort William is a romantic one, offering a magical mix of native Caledonian pine forests, glistening lochs and enchanting moorlands. Enjoy it on foot or from horseback, as the newly-wed Claire and Jamie did after their wedding, and admire scenic landscapes and great wildlife along the way. You will be rewarded with breathtaking views of the mountains, which get even more dramatic as you approach Fort William, the 'Outdoor Capital of the UK'.

Glenfinnan Monument

Red Deer Glenfinnan Monument

The monument marks the spot where Bonnie Prince Charlie raised his standard, starting the 1745 Jacobite Rising. Set amidst typically superb Highland scenery at the head of Loch Shiel, near Fort William, the Glenfinnan Monument is a tribute to the Jacobite clansmen who fought and died in the cause of Prince Charles Edward Stuart. Atop the 18m high column is a lone kilted Highlander who surveys the land where the Highland way of life was soon to be extinguished. At its visitor centre, learn about and be stirred by this tumultuous chapter in Scotland's history.

Culloden Battlefield

Culloden sunset

It's here that Claire and Jamie said their tearful goodbyes. Visit this eerie but atmospheric site where many clans, including the Frasers and MacKenzies, fought in the 1745 Jacobite Rising alongside Bonnie Prince Charlie. You can learn more about the events leading up to, during, and after the Battle of Culloden at the award-winning Culloden Battlefield Visitor Centre with the exciting interactive exhibition, immersive film and battlefield tour. As you tour the site, ponder for a moment and pay tribute to those who lost their lives in the last battle ever fought on British soil.

Edinburgh's famous Royal Mile and the Old Town

Royal Mile Performers

Scotland's capital city is the setting for a number of scenes in the books. Wander the atmospheric cobbled streets and narrow wynds of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh's Old Town, where Claire and Jamie reunite after 20 years. Packed full of history, the Canongate and Holyrood sections of the Royal Mile are two of the Old Town's most fascinating areas. They form part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the buildings here have remained largely unchanged for centuries.

Palace of Holyroodhouse

Palace of Holyroodhouse Edinburgh

No Outlander experience would be complete without a visit to the Palace of Holyroodhouse, the official residence of HM The Queen in Scotland, and where Claire and Jamie beseeched the Prince to abandon his hopeless cause. The palace is situated at the end of the Royal Mile, and is closely associated with Scotland's turbulent past, including Bonnie Prince Charlie, who held court here during his attempt to reclaim the throne for his father. Other royal figures include Mary Queen of Scots, who lived here, as well as successive kings and queens who have made the palace the premier royal residence in Scotland.

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